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Friday, July 14, 2006

Another View of Sharon


This is one of the most curious farms in Sharon - I always wonder who lives here when I drive by! Click to see the large version to really get the feel of it!

14 Comments:

Blogger Felicia said...

Looks like an old place. Is it used for grain storage? Nice big tire there too!

3:03 AM  
Anonymous portelini said...

Looks a very old farm, with lots os variety and color! Very nice capture...I wouldn't find this in a suburban place like the one I live in...
Have you seen my photographs at my blog? There's a collection of photographs that describe quite well my place... Maybe there's not in the first 5-10 pics (the last ones), but is just to click on the "previous entries" link to acess others, that apears at the bottom of each page. If you notice that some of my shots are from the sames places as "Nowhereman", it's not a coincidence, we live in the suburbs of the same city, in distant palces, though.

Thanks

4:21 AM  
Blogger Kala said...

that is a large chimney haha - actually it gives a great feel for the resident area.

4:32 AM  
Blogger Nowhere Man said...

Well, I would take it, if yesterday's doesn't work out. Has a lot of character. Is it a working farm? And is that all timber, including the tower? Could be a hideout for the Ma Cheney gang...

9:36 AM  
Blogger Kris said...

seems abandoned. what's that tower for?

10:13 AM  
Anonymous anne said...

Looks like a big water drum...what's the blue tower for?

10:23 AM  
Blogger bob said...

Hi Jenny
Nice shot. It reminds me of my uncle's pig farm that I often visted as a child, which had things scattered about all over the place just like this one. He loved pigs more than he did people and got very upset when the ruck came along to take them away to teh slaugtherhouse. I was too little to ask him why he didn't do something else

10:32 AM  
Anonymous Max said...

yes, its a working farm.The "towers"(the white wood and the blue metal) are silo's, where farmers store sileage (chopped hay and corn) to feed cows. So neatness is not in the farmers vocab. At least he's still here, pluggin' along, and not selling out to developers or new zillionairs.....

11:57 AM  
Anonymous dominique said...

Beutiful farm, beautiful wooded country also...

1:21 PM  
Blogger Jenny said...

Max - hear hear about the farmer - I just read that Connecticut is losing 45 acres of farmland every DAY to development! At that rate it won't be beautiful and rural here for much longer!

2:25 PM  
Blogger chris.h. said...

Jenny ,huge apologies that I havnt been round for a while--life has been mad to say the least!
Anyway glad Ive caught up and you have posted some great images of your town.Your images always give a feel of what goes on and the sort of place you live in.

3:22 PM  
Anonymous max said...

jenny--you obviously read some figures which are indeed scary, if you're one who wants there to be SOMEPLACE in America that doesn't get swallowed up due to greed, in the name of developement and someones darn profit... Ct. still has room for development, but it needs to be mindful of the temptation of the surge from greater urban areas, and continue to purchase developement rights from large tract owners. I don't wan't to hang out the "closed" sign, but a temporary "No Vacancy" sounds, at times....wishful? max

3:30 PM  
Blogger Jenny said...

Max, I just read that figure in this week's Lakeville (CT) Journal - it comes from a study by the Trust for Public Land. I for one think the trend of leaving (abandoning) cities, everyone needing a giant house and several acres of land, and building housing developments and strip malls to maximize profit and maximize environmental ruin is not a good thing! There are lots of people pioneering ways to have smart, green growth, and sensible development, but it requires abandoning the mentality tha says everyone needs a 4,000 square foot house! (You Europeans have NO idea what's going on here!)

4:18 PM  
Blogger Nowhere Man said...

Oh yes, we DO! There is a generalised belief, fuelled by a long history of diverse inputs - not least via the media - that everything in the US exists on a LARGE scale. The local & regional details may get lost, of course, but the big picture perception is that is ...well, big. I happen to agree with you fully Jenny. The question of what an individual or a family needs has become totally distorted by material greed basically, but that must be supported by the ethos of the pursuit of "happiness" and the notion that we (that is, you), live in a huge empty landmass and we can do whatever we like, because we are free - capital allowing -to do whatever we like, without restraint. Bigger/More = better. Correct me if I'm wrong; I'm nearly as far from there as you are from here, in some ways....

6:16 PM  

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